2019 in Review

10907979-7F60-45BA-A881-07E7078CA2D6I keep struggling with how I want this post to start. When I reflect back on this year, even though some really great things happened, there is also a sense of relief in this year being done. 2019 came with fantastic high points, and stressful, anxiety-inducing challenges that led to some rough lows for me. Some of the most impactful lessons I learned this year were that I need to be busy — I like being busy and it helps me thrive, but at the same time if I don’t learn to manage my stress better, I am afraid I’ll drive myself into an early grave because of how damned awful stress can be on your mind, body, and willpower. I hope 2020 shows me a better way to live (honestly being an overworked adjunct has just chewed up my soul, so send me good vibes in my job search for this year, please); again, I like being busy, but I don’t like being so overworked and underpaid that I feel desperately hopeless. I recently felt so guilty that I did not make my small Goodreads goal this year, but then I remembered how long I spend reading hundreds of student papers, journals, projects, and more in order to provide substantial and helpful feedback, so hey, fuck that guilt.

I want 2020 to be a year of hope, and a year where I do not feel guilty for things like the above example. While some things are out of my control, I will do everything in my control to make it a year that I can embrace and look forward to. I like keeping my private life private, and while I share a bit on social media, it’s been really peaceful to keep much of my life to myself and to those I love. I am immensely grateful to my friends and family who have been incredibly supportive this year and all years. And of course it’s been a blast getting to know more authors, readers, and reviewers through social media — I hope to meet so many of you in person soon!

Here are a few of my highlights from 2019, and a few things I am really looking forward to in 2020!

2019 in Review:

Screen Shot 2019-12-03 at 10.41.20 AM*StokerCon in Grand Rapids, Michigan was probably the highlight of my year. I wrote a recap of that here, so I won’t echo too much again, but in a nutshell I got to hang out with some of my favorite humans in existence and The Devil’s Dreamland took home a freaking Stoker Award, so it doesn’t get much more surreal and amazing than that. I also got to sit with Gwendolyn Kiste who has become such a sweet friend and watch her win an award for The Rust Maidens, which was spectacular!

*The Devil’s Dreamland: Poetry Inspired by H.H. Holmes was included in Night Worms! (yay!)

*My debut novella, To Be Devoured, was released in July by Unnerving! I was nervousTo Be Devouredjune2019 about this book, so to see positive (and repulsed) receptions and reactions of this sick and twisted glimpse into my prose has been incredibly motivating. Thank you to everyone who picked up the book and dared to dine with the vultures.

*To celebrate the tenth year of Women in Horror Month this past February, I did 10 posts (9 of them feature interviews) with some incredible ladies in the genre that I hope you will check out if you did not before!

*Having my short story, “Smeared Star in Your Hands” be selected from over 700 others to be included in The Twisted Book of Shadows (I doubt myself a lot as a short story writer, so this was an amazing moment)

*Some other writing-related things I enjoyed this year included this podcast interview by Unnerving’s Eddie Generous with myself and Gwendolyn Kiste, guest editing an issue of Eye to the Telescope that featured an infection theme, writing up a post called “Killing the Tortured Artist” for the Ladies of Horror Fiction, doing this in-depth interview by David Cowen who asked such wonderful questions, and chatting about Pet Sematary with the Ink to Film Podcast!

I was fortunate to do a few other podcasts and posts this year, all of which are compiled here (plus other years) if you are interested.

*Shortly after StokerCon, Mike Arnzen and I collaborated on getting the HWA Pittsburgh Chapter up and running! We had our first two meetings this year and are greatly looking forward to the future of the chapter. Thank you to everyone who has attended meetings, helped organize events and readings, and been as enthusiastic as we are for this creation! If you are local and interested in joining the HWA and our Pittsburgh Chapter, email us at hwapittsburgh@gmail.com

 

Bring on 2020:

What am I working on for 2020? Right now it feels like a million things, but let me share what I can…

Screen Shot 2019-04-28 at 6.23.47 PM*My third poetry collection, which is inspired by the Black Death and other plagues and diseases is coming along (I should be able to share more about this soon!) — you can read a poem from the collection below!

*I am currently working on a really cool collaborative project, but that’s all I can say for now 🙂

*I am so looking forward to working with my mentee through the HWA Mentorship program! (*waves* hi Angela!)

*Also looking forward to FINALLY attending Scares That Care! I will see you in Virginia this summer if you’re going — please come say hi!

*One of my biggest goals this year is to write a novel I’ve been plotting; if I can get a draft done by the end of the year, I’ll be thrilled

Not All Monsters*And finally, perhaps what I am most excited for….NOT ALL MONSTERS! (!!!!) This gorgeous book brought to you by Strangehouse Books will be out in Fall 2020. It is all full of deliciously dark stories by women who write horror, and I cannot wait to get this beautiful beast into your hands. Check out the TOC here.

It has been an honor to be the editor for this project, truly. Huge thank you to Nicholas Day and Don Noble for their organization, team work, art work, and for being lovely humans.

 

 

*All in all, 2020 is shaping up to be busy. I am excited for the challenges, for the late nights and early mornings, for new adventures and for something that I hope continues to give me courage. I wish you all nothing but amazing successes in the new year.

And finally — thank you to everyone who voted on my Twitter poll for which poem I should share from the new collection. I hope you enjoy reading this piece, “Blackbirds, Black Death”

 

Blackbirds, Black Death

Blackbirds outside my window
have you come to take me away?
My sister is dying, but together we waste
and count the days, the days, the days…

I’d rather follow you into the skies
away from choking black smoke,
away from dark soil where death blooms
on grotesque petals and charcoal stems
swell until blood drips down the stalks.

Bells sing distorted songs in the distance
chiming again for departed souls, striking
melodies against the harsh growl of thunder,
but sister still dies, crinkled like a lifeless spider
in my arms, for she is dead, and I am dead
in this place the blackbirds call home.

When blackbirds come to drain my blood,
their beaks stuffed with straw and juniper
I offer my eyes as penance for sin, to combat
God’s severance, but we are despised
and left nothing but rot, and ruin, and rats.

When blackbirds come to take her away at last,
we decompose together, imprinted memories
stain childhood blankets, infection reeks
from frayed threads as doctors dressed in black
pretend they are birds, but it is too late,
and I no longer count the days, the days, the days…

We twine together and choke, smoldering embers
of our home reach across the floor
colored in our bloodletting, yet the smoke
smells like mint as the blackbirds retreat,
and we will never follow them into the skies.

Because when blackbirds come, they are but men
buttoned up in masks, coats, and presumptions
that they know better, they know a cure,
but they know nothing except death,
the scent of putrid bodies mixed with herbs,
the swelling of buboes before they burst.

Sister, we once planted imaginary gardens
for imaginary birds, but now blackbird men
have materialized from that secret place
and stand guard outside my window,
have they come to take me away?

Dear sister is dead, so together we waste
and count the days, the days, the days…

 

 

 

 

 

Debut Novella Release!

I am so excited to share that my third standalone book is being released today! This is my debut novella, and I am thrilled to finally unleash its darkness. It is available in paperback and on Kindle here!

The wonderful and talented Gwendolyn Kiste and Christa Carmen blurbed the book — check out what they had to say!

“Sara Tantlinger’s To Be Devoured capitalizes on our macabre preoccupation with the uglier side of nature, with love that topples into obsession, and with madness that is strangely beautiful in its barbarity. Her writing is equivalent to those unremitting avian beings her protagonist is so enamored of: It will hook its talons through your flesh, sink its neck into the ribboned edges of your wounds, and only relinquish your blighted body when it has swallowed your very soul.” –Christa Carmen, author of Something Borrowed, Something Blood-Soaked, winner of the Indie Horror Book Awards for Best Debut Collection

“Vultures, obsession, and an unnatural hunger: What more can you want in a horror story? With To Be Devoured, Sara Tantlinger has done it again as she ratchets up the terror in wonderfully surprising ways while crafting prose that’s always a heady blend of the vicious and the vibrant. A book that’s absolutely not to be missed!” –Gwendolyn Kiste, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of The Rust Maidens

 

To Be Devouredjune2019

 

Monsters, Infection, and Carrion

ICYMI

*The cover for Not All Monsters, designed by the magical Don Noble, is live! I’m in love with it and want the design framed above my bed. It’s gotten fantastic responses so far, which makes me hopeful there will be good interest in this anthology and the future things we may have plans for… 😉 Stay tuned. There’s so much I want to say about the stories in the anthology, but I’m going to save it for later since the book won’t be out until Fall 2020. Good things are worth waiting for, my friends. We’re taking our time to make something really spectacular.

Not All Monsters

 

*There are 5 days left to submit to Eye to the Telescope #33 with the theme INFECTION, which I am guest editing. PLEASE read guidelines carefully. Poems MUST have speculative elements for full consideration. Deadline is June 15th. I look forward to your deadly contagions. I’ve already received hundreds of poems, so it’s going to be intense narrowing these down!

*If you missed it, Gwendolyn Kiste and I were interviewed by Eddie Generous for the Unnerving podcast. We talked about StokerCon and read excerpts from our upcoming books! My novella (paperback and eBook) will be out July 29th, but if eBooks are your thing, you can pre-order those.

Pre-order Gwendolyn’s chapbook here!

To Be Devoured-2*Speaking of my novella, the first early review is here! Thank you so much to Joe and Charlotte at Horrorbound for the review and interview. The review is lovely and made my entire month:

“While the story was fantastically and grotesquely perfect, it is not just the plot that has me gushing over this. The language in this novella is both beautiful and disturbing. Tantlinger shows off her mastery of language with incredibly poetic lines throughout the novella. I was in awe of the contrast between the perfection of the words used and the twisted subject matter they described.”

*Also last week, I stepped into Stephanie Wytovich’s Madhouse for an interview where we chatted true crime, H.H. Holmes, and more. Thanks so much to Stephanie for having me and providing great questions!

*Thanks for catching up with me — I’m working on story edits for Not All Monsters now and reading through the 300+poems I’ve received so far for ETTT, so maybe next month I’ll be caught up and get back into my own WIP project 😉

StokerCon 2019 Recap

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 9.04.46 PMWhat a weekend. Where do I even begin? StokerCon 2019 was an amazing adventure. Right off the bat I have to say my favorite thing was the support of this community. Seeing the amazing work that everyone is doing is really exciting. I think it also encourages each one of us to do our best and challenge ourselves, too. I look forward to the HWA’s continued outreach for diversity and inclusiveness. This is an area I am really aiming to be more proactive in, as well.

I don’t think I could capture everything in a recap post, but here are some highlights from my favorite parts of the trip:

*Reuniting with friends and making new ones — I’m going to try and remember names here, but if I leave anyone out it’s because my brain is fried, so I apologize if I miss anyone!

Something I was really excited about this year was that my good friends from graduate school, Kristy and Mike, were able to attend. Hanging out with them and catching up was wonderful. They are two of the best people I know (and are both killer writers). I also got to catch up with many people I haven’t seen in so long: The brilliant EV Knight who has a debut novel coming that I cannot wait to read; Bill and Jeanne Bush, Linda Addison, David Cowen, Marge Simon, Nick Diak, Matt Betts, Brian Keene, Wile E. Young, Chad Stroup, Tim Waggoner, Donna Munro, Hanna Gribble, and more — it was fantastic seeing you all again!

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 9.03.33 PM

Myself with Sarah Read and A.E. Siraki!

I also FINALLY got to meet online friends in person, which was so delightful. These people included Gwendolyn Kiste, Gabino Iglesias, Sarah Read, A.E. Siraki, David Busboom, Kathryn McGee, RJ Joseph, Kathleen Kaufman, Leza Cantoral, Christoph Paul, Gaby Triana, Cina Pelayo,  — even though some conversations were brief, it was incredible seeing you all in person. I hope we meet again! (sorry if I missed anyone, like I said, brain = dead)

*The poetry reading with Saba Razvi and Donna Lynch. This was honestly the most fun reading I think I’ve ever done.

 

The atmosphere was so relaxed, the three of us were into each other’s work, and everything was fun and supportive.

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 9.03.56 PM

Queens of Horror Poetry 😉

We had a great Q and A session with the audience after our readings, and I think we just really dominated as women in horror who write bloody good poems. Getting to know both of these ladies better and spending time with them was a real joy. Please check out their work!

*Panels: Moderating the historical horror panel was incredibly fun. I received great feedback from the attendees, which didn’t surprise me because the panelists are literal superstars, and their answers to my questions were informative, inspirational, and

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 9.04.33 PM

The awesome panelists for Historical Horror

genuine. Thank you again to Lisa Morton, Lisa Kroger, Kevin J. Wetmore, Alma Katsu, and Kathleen Kaufman.
*I was also on the weird poetry panel moderated by the wonderful David Cowen. I had a great time with my fellow panelists answering David’s thoughtful questions and delving deeper into how weird poetry can be defined.
*Also, the panels I attended were really fantastic overall — everyone killed it this year. Thank you so much to the organizers, Brian Matthews, and all the volunteers.

*And of course, the Stoker banquet Saturday night. Saturday was especially exciting to

Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 9.03.15 PM

Some of my favorite people in the world. I think this is our album cover. Ha.

me because Nick Day and Don Noble, the minds behind StrangeHouse Books, made a crazy one-day trip just to come hang out and be supportive of my nomination. This meant the world to me (and still does). I am still stunned, humbled, and thrilled that The Devil’s Dreamland took home the Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in Poetry Saturday night. Being nominated along with such great talents (Donna Lynch, Marge Simon, Alessandro Manzetti, Bruce Boston, and David Cowen) was a huge honor. I could not believe I was even nominated.

I sat with a wonderful table at the banquet, which included the lovely Gwendolyn Kiste. The fact that we both got to share our wins together was really incredible. The whole experience has been surreal. Again, thank you to everyone who has supported the book and myself in any way. It means the world. You can watch the speeches from the livestream on YouTube — they start around the 3:50:00 mark, and then the first category starts around 4:19:00. As I mentioned in my speech, having my former thesis mentor, Mike Arnzen, be the one to announce that I won was a pretty special moment. Hearing my friends cheer and whoop and clap, having friends and family text me congrats and raise their glasses, was all something I will never forget. It’s giving me goosebumps and making me grin as I write this out. I love you all to death. Thank you for your support and faith when I could not always see it in myself.

Huge congratulations to all the winners and nominees!

 

 

*I always learn so much from these experiences. This year, I think I am finally learning that sometimes you may encounter someone who decides to snub or dismiss you for whatever reason, but that it always says more about their own insecurities and issues than it does your talent and how damned hard you work. I don’t have time for people like that. Instead, I am going to continue to surround myself with supportive friends and company who have often taught me and are continuing to teach me to believe in myself. The biggest thing I really did learn from this con experience is to simply believe in myself and my work, to understand that I do belong in this world and community. To all who have helped show me that through all the support and love, thank you.

It’s doubtful I’ll make it to StokerCon UK 2020, but I will absolutely see you all again in Denver for 2021!

To Be Devoured

The pre-orders for my debut novella, To Be Devoured, are now live on Amazon here! All other versions will be available when the book is out on July 29th from Unnerving.

To Be Devoured-2

From the back cover:

What does carrion taste like? Andi has to know. The vultures circling outside her home taunt and invite her to come understand the secrets hiding in their banquet of decay. Fascination morphs into an obsessive need to know what the vultures know. Andi turns to Dr. Fawning, but even the therapist cannot help Andi comprehend the secrets she’s buried beneath her anger-induced blackouts.

Her girlfriend, Luna, tries to help Andi battle her inner darkness and infatuation with the vultures. However, the desire to taste dead flesh, to stitch together wings of her own and become one with the flock sends Andi down a twisted, unforgivable path. Once she understands the secrets the vultures conceal, she must decide between abandoning the birds of prey or risk turning her loved ones into nothing more than meals to be devoured.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WiHM, Not All Monsters, and More, Oh My!

Screen Shot 2019-02-27 at 6.22.45 PMThis month I was really lucky to feature nine incredible ladies of horror and their work. I had intended to feature 10 ladies to echo the decade mark for Women in Horror Month’s existence, but unfortunately my last guest had some scheduling conflicts, so rather than scrambling and begging someone to do a last minute interview, I decided to write something up myself!

If you missed the nine interviews, please check them out here because holy smokes, these ladies are up to some incredible, wicked works that you don’t want to miss. A huge thank you to everyone who took time out of their schedules to join me and share more about their work, processes, identity, and more.

In addition to the interviews, I wrapped up some final decisions for the Not All Monsters anthology this month (to be published in 2020 with StrangeHouse Books). The listing is now closed, but if you’re curious about the info/theme, I’ll link it here. The anthology wasScreen Shot 2019-02-27 at 6.39.02 PM an open call for women who write horror, and I am pleased to say I received nearly 300 submissions from all across the globe! That’s a lot of badass ladies writing amazing, vicious, gorgeous, darkly beautiful stories out there.

*Side note — if you submitted to the open call awhile ago and have heard nothing back, keep an eye out. We have decided to send out the acceptances in batches in an effort to keep the book fresh in peoples’ minds since the publication won’t be until 2020. Read more about that on the publisher’s post here.

This anthology was without a doubt the biggest thing I have been an editor for to-date, and I loved it! I hope I have the opportunity to edit more things like it in the future. Here are some things I learned so far, but it’s not over yet:

*Sending out rejections is AWFUL and I hate it…but it’s a necessary part of the job. I also think most people understand that it isn’t personal, it’s all professional and based on what works best for the theme/anthology/goes with the other stories without being too similar, etc…

*Reading that many stories IS overwhelming, and I think I will adapt a better method the next time I do this

*However, seeing the creativity and different way women approached this theme was amazing

*There were a lot of similar themes based around abuse and other trauma in the stories that was heartbreaking because I just knew that so many of those writers had probably experienced something in their own life that may have led to bleeding out some cathartic remedy onto the page. So if you submitted, no matter what happens with your story, I hope you were able to purge some of the bad out and breathe a little easier. You are brave, and amazing, and I love you.

*Women are incredible. But you and I already knew that 🙂 And if anyone ever complains that there aren’t enough women writing horror out there, send them to me. I know about 300 women who are.

February has been a heavy social media month for me, and I think I’m due for a break to work on some of my own projects. Until then, happy writing. Let’s celebrate women in horror all year long!

 

WiHM Interview with Christina Sng

This year we are celebrating a decade of showcasing women in horror! In honor of something so close to my heart, I am featuring ten amazing ladies in horror on my blog all month long to celebrate their incredible creativity and work in the field.

My next guest is Christina Sng! I adore Christina’s work and am thrilled to have her here today. Not only is she so talented, she is one of the kindest writers I have had the pleasure to interact with. Happy reading!

ChristinaSngChristina Sng is an award-winning poet, writer, and artist. Her work has appeared in numerous venues worldwide, including Apex Magazine, Dreams and Nightmares, Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, New Myths, and Polu Texni. She is the author of the Bram Stoker Award-winning A COLLECTION OF NIGHTMARES (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2017) and Elgin Award winner ASTROPOETRY (Alban Lake Publishing, 2017). Her poems have received nominations in the Rhysling Awards, the Dwarf Stars, as well as honorable mentions in the Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, and the Best Horror of the Year. Christina is also an avid gardener and an accomplished musician, and can be found most days in a dark corner deadheading her flowers while humming Vivaldi to the swaying branches.

ST: Christina’s poetry book, A Collection of Nightmares, is an incredibly beautiful and dark compendium, which earned her a Bram Stoker Award for poetry, and she is the first Singaporean to win the accolade! Congratulations on all your hard work and success! I know you are always writing and sending new work out. Did having your collection do so well let you breathe for a few moments before working on something new, or did it pressure or maybe inspire you to get right back into writing the next project?

CS: Thank you so much for your well wishes! Part of me still thinks I dreamed it all. 😀 I do feel compelled to get my next collection out sooner, which is a good thing or else I could be sitting on it for another twenty years like I did the first one!

ST: I’m already looking forward to it!

You also do some beautiful artwork, and from the pieces I have seen online, the work often contains fantastical or science-fiction themes. Do you approach horror and science-fiction in a similar way, or does your process differ when you’re concentrating more on one theme than the other?

CS: Thank you for your lovely words on my artwork! With art, I tend to go where the inspiration takes me, be it science fiction or horror or fantasy. Art, for me, is deliberate. I need to be absolutely calm or in a rage, my mind “in the zone” before my hand will paint or draw. Conversely, with poetry and fiction, it just flows. I often puzzle at the difference. Maybe it is simply that I’ve just had more practice writing over the years.

When I paint, I tend to stick to one theme till I’ve exhausted myself of it. When I am painting in oil, I try to master the sky and grass. With ink, it is always a tree and everything around it, usually a darkness or space objects. Clearly, I have mastered neither because I am still at it. 😀

To tell you the truth, the familiarity is comforting. Art brings me a sense of peace and completion, probably because when it is done, it is done. What you see is what you get, and if it looks nice, it goes on the wall. There aren’t many on the wall!

ST: I love that contrast between your processes for writing and art. I also wish you many more paintings to hang on the wall! 

Women being drawn to horror has always made perfect sense to me as a way to confront our own daily horrors, to unleash the brewing darkness in our heads, and as a way to just have fun with our creativity. What draws you personally to the horror genre?

CS: I think growing up in the 80s helped, being immersed in an era where horror was completely revered. As a child, I spent a lot of time alone, playing in a shadowy haunted house built opposite a former World War II torture chamber. With such a legacy, I was wary but I never saw anything supernatural. After a time, the dark no longer frightened me. I felt safe in the pitch black and became drawn to horror like a honey bee to a flower.

Horror movies were huge on TV back when we had just 4 channels. My older brother is a big fan and introduced me to the genre when I was 7. This was a time when there was no remote control on a video recorder to fast forward the scary bits, so I sat through them, mastering the art of defocusing my eyes when I didn’t want to see what was on the screen.

My first horror movies were The Amityville Horror, Poltergeist, and Hell Night. That is possibly why I am not fond of slasher or supernatural horror but much prefer creature features with vampires, zombies, demons, and giant monsters that like to eat people, as evidenced by my absolute favorites from that era: Demon Knight, Invitation to Hell, The Bermuda Depths, The Blob, and Deep Rising.

In bookshops, there were shelves and shelves of horror novels and I devoured every one I could get my hands on. I must have read each of my favorite novels at least 20 times in my life. Over the years, I have justified my huge library by reading my books over and over. It appears that my son has inherited this trait from me. We will need floor-to-ceiling bookshelves very soon. I better go pick up carpentry.

ST: I’m all here for floor-to-ceiling bookshelves! I love that your son has inherited that trait, too. 

What is a piece of advice you’d give to women just starting in the field, or what is something you wish someone would have told you before you started getting involved with horror projects?

CS: Just write. Write something every day. Use prompts if nothing inspires you. It creates Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 6.58.13 PMa habit of writing that keeps you going.

Connect with other writers. Writing can be a lonely journey without others who understand the writing life and support you.

ST: I know there are thousands of incredible horror ladies out there, but who is one woman in horror who inspires you particularly? What is it about this person’s work or personality that speaks to you?

CS: I can’t name just one. Women in horror have been incredible. We are a tribe. Each woman inspires me in so many ways, most of which is how we all play our part in keeping us together as an inclusive and supportive community.

I greatly admire you, Erin Sweet Al-Mehairi, Gwendolyn Kiste, Stephanie Wytovich, and so many other women interviewers and reviewers who take time out of your own hectic schedules to give women in horror a space to showcase and promote our work. My publisher Jennifer Barnes who has been the gale force behind so many magnificent books by women.

Women editors with whom I’ve worked with many times and who I can’t stop writing for, including Teri Santitoro, Terrie Leigh Relf, Dawn Albright, and Susan Shell Winston, among others.

Nina D’Arcangela and Erin Lydia Prime for the wonderful Ladies of Horror Flash Project. They have inspired me through flu and drought to write numerous poems and stories, one of which has just been nominated for a Rhysling Award and another which is my very first sale to Daily Science Fiction!

Women who run and support the organizations that promote horror, such as Lisa Morton, Rena Mason, Angel Leigh McCoy, Kathy Ptacek, FJ Bergmann, Diane Severson Mori, Renee Ya, Deborah P Kolodji, and so many more.

Linda Addison and Marge Simon who have been titans and community leaders in the industry, always supportive and kind. Their work is exquisitely beautiful and their embrace of poetry, fiction, and/or art as one practice has inspired me to do the same. I am so grateful for the advice and support they’ve given me over the years. I would not have made it here without them.

ST: Wonderful, thank you for all these great names for us to know and keep up-to-date with! And congratulations on the Rhysling nomination and sale to Daily Science Fiction!

One of the reasons I enjoy Women in Horror Month is because it gives us a chance to both reflect on how horror is evolving and reacting to societal and cultural changes, and it allows women to highlight the issues and obstacles we are still facing. What are your hopes for the future of women in horror, or just for keeping the momentum going all year long for more diversity within the genre?

CS: I hope that our stories become brighter, more hopeful, and joyful as a reflection of a better, kinder world for women.

ST: What are you working on this year or what do you have coming out? Where can we find you to keep up-to-date with your work?

ACollectionofNightmareswithStokerAwardCS: I expect to finish my next three collections of poetry this year—one horror, one haiku, one children’s, get more fiction published for my eventual short story collection in 2028, start on my already-drafted three-part novel (I hear my muse laughing her head off at this one), and write more dark poems before the light overwhelms me.

Facebook carries my latest updates, Twitter is updated about once a week, and my website, if the planets align, once a fortnight.

Thank you so much for this wonderful interview! 😀

 

 

ST: Best of luck! And I am totally in awe that you have a project for 2028 planned already! That’s amazing. I’ll eagerly await all your forthcoming work. Thank you, Christina! 

Be sure to keep up with Christina’s work on her website, http://www.christinasng.com and connect on social media @christinasng.

Ordering information for A COLLECTION OF NIGHTMARES: http://bit.ly/acollectionofnightmares